Sunday, June 25, 2017

The Most Important Ingredient For Writing Success, Part Two

Last week I wrote about how Lin-Manuel Miranda didn't just write some great tunes and then, presto, had a smash hit with his musical Hamilton. It was clear that he had a plan to succeed. He knew that he had to write an enormous amount and he had to have a focus on how he was going to make it all come together. The message to the rest of us creative-content producers is to realize that you can't just write some stuff or even a bunch of stuff. You have to know how it will all come together, and then you have to doggedly work to assemble the steps, one by one.

A musical is a good example of how a plan is necessary because we instinctively understand that it is a big production. It's not like writing a single novel and then hoping to have a smash hit.

And yet, it actually is very much like writing novels.

With very few exceptions, almost no one has ever written a single novel and then had a smash hit. It sometimes looks from the outside like that is what happened. But when you do a little research, you find that the one-book wonder actually wrote multiple other books under a pseudonym. Or has a pile of books in a drawer that no one has ever seen. Or ghost-wrote books for a celebrity author who has no writing skills. Or, like Lin-Manuel Miranda, wrote a series of books without immediately publishing them, then edited and rewrote and edited and rewrote some more. When the first book was delivered to the agent/editor or was self-published, the advance reviews and blurbs were all ready to print. If you haven't done that, why not?

This is not a write-it-and-the-readers-will-come enterprise. This is a careful, thoughtful process where every major question has been posed and then answered before the writer ever reveals her first book. Lin-Manuel has shown us the way. Have a thorough plan and then execute it step-by-step. Know where you're going. Do your due diligence.

So my challenge to anyone who reads this is the same as my challenge to myself. Look very carefully at what motivates readers (or theater goers) to devour certain kinds of books or stage shows or any other type of intellectual entertainment (as opposed to watching team sports or riding the roller coaster at the amusement park). There are a thousand components. Study them. Sympathetic characters in trouble, gripping plots that intensify those troubles. surprise that worries and surprise that delights.

Next, study how it is delivered and how an audience is built. Miranda learned how the theater works. And he didn't just produce one spectacular show. He built a body of work. Multiple musicals. (And starring roles for himself!) Miranda shows that you don't have to brag your way to getting attention. Instead, position yourself to get noticed. Be ready to take on opportunity. If you write a musical and your skill is such that someone is willing to put up the dollars to produce it, does the starring role go to someone you've never heard of? Much better to take the time to learn to sing and dance and act. Be available for your success! This approach applies to all of the creative arts, including novelists. When the libraries and book clubs call and ask you to come and give a talk, is it already written? Can you give them 20 minutes or 40 minutes plus Q & A? Are the jokes and the self-deprecating lines ready for their laughs? Will you be prepared for the radio interviews? If not, why? You're a writer. Write those talks. Write those jokes. Be ready for your success.

Another aspect to your plan is the big picture. If you are a novelist, don't, I repeat, DON'T just write one novel. Unless you are Margaret Mitchell or Harper Lee, you won't go anywhere. Plan your SHELF of books. Plan them IN ADVANCE. Plan a series. Plan characters who will populate that shelf. There are almost no one-book wonders. In fact, even among authors who write multiple books, there are almost none who are successful unless their books fit into a plan, books that are linked by series or characters or, at the minimum, theme. Don't just write. Write to a comprehensive plan.

That may just be the most important ingredient for writing success.

P.S. We saw Hamilton in San Francisco, and it was great. It was obvious that it wasn't put together by someone who merely had a great idea about writing a musical. This was a tour de force, created with great planning and relentless effort and follow through. We can all learn from that kind of focus. That kind of plan.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

The Most Important Ingredient For Writing Success

Let's say you came up with a great idea for a novel. Now let's say you sat down and wrote that novel.

Is that a big deal? Yes, absolutely, that's huge. Congratulations. You've done something that very few people have done. If you're like most writers, you don't have any friends who have written a novel. This is a rare accomplishment, so you deserve to feel proud.

Will it bring you writing success?

If all you've got is a novel, even a very good novel, probably not.

Sorry, I realize that's harsh. The unfortunate truth is that there are millions of novels out there, and a significant number of them - if not a large percentage - are good. But hang in there a moment. I'm going to give you an idea of how to get success.

So what else do you need?

The answer came to me like an epiphany, which, as the cliche says, only took ten years to strike me overnight.

What else do you need? A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN. Is acquiring a plan an incredibly hard thing to do? Maybe not. But you must have it, and I'll explain why.

First, let me tell you how this realization came to be.

I was thinking about Lin-Manuel Miranda and his extraordinary success writing the book and music and lyrics for the musical Hamilton. Oh, right, he also starred in it. And it immediately went on to become the most successful Broadway show in memory. It made an ungodly number of millions of dollars. His Hamilton cast recording topped Billboard's Rap chart for ten weeks, and his Hamilton Mixtape album hit number 1 on the Billboard 200. The musical is still sold out on Broadway even as the national touring company is beginning to bring it across the country.



Has Mr. Miranda done anything else notable? Just a little. He wrote the musical "In The Heights" and also starred in it on Broadway. (He completed the first draft of In The Heights while he was a sophomore in college. And he wrote other musicals while in college.) He also helped write the hit Disney movie Moana. He's starring in the upcoming movie Mary Poppins Returns. He's won a Pulitzer Prize, two Grammys, an Emmy, three Tony Awards. And there was that little confidence booster he won called a MacArthur Genius Fellowship. He's written jingles, co-founded a Hip Hop comedy group and a whole lotta other stuff. As a result of his amazing body of work, he was awarded an honorary Doctorate from Wesleyan University.

Of course, all of this success takes a huge amount of time, right? I imagined that putting together such a career would take many decades of hard work. When I first learned about Miranda, I guessed that he was probably 60 years old. Maybe 50 at the youngest. Possibly 70. Good guess?

No. Miranda is only 37.

So my rhetorical question to myself was this: Did this Miranda dude just happen to write some stuff and it became enormously, immeasurably successful? Was he a one or two-musical wonder boy? No. It seems obvious that he had a plan. A comprehensive, well-thought-out plan. I don't know the exact details, but I have a pretty good idea of how it went down.

Way back in high school, he was focused on writing and working in theater. While the rest of his classmates were, like me at that age, riding their bicycles and skiing and thinking about dating, he was working. When he went to college, he wrote with great determination. I don't imagine he participated in many pizza-and-beer parties.

Is there anything wrong with biking and skiing and pizza parties? Of course not. But Miranda had a plan that was more important. He was one of those people who won't be denied. His future success at writing was like the laws of physics, immutable. I'm certain that he didn't just try to write clever rap songs that would be shaped into a musical. Instead, he no doubt determined that he would find theatrical success by thinking carefully about how to set himself apart from all the other wannabes. And once he decided how he would write to that goal, he pursued it step by step, refusing to be deterred by the uncountable obstacles in the way of all creative people.

Of course, the usual stuff about work ethic and tenacity still applies. Stuff like what Einstein said, that persistence trumps genius. The current popular term is grit. Success comes to those who have the grit to keep going no matter what. The Japanese proverb also applies, Fall Seven Times, Stand Up Eight.

The problem for writers is that grit and persistence, while very important, aren't enough. Just because you keep on writing doesn't mean you'll find a writing career.

This is where a comprehensive plan comes in. What are the steps in this plan? Tune in next week, and I'll lay out some ideas to get you there.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

June 8th and 9th, More Winter In Tahoe

June 8th, 2017. The snow has been gone on the north side of our house (elevation 6450) for a week. Most Tahoe areas below 7000 feet are snow free. (Although there are many patches along the West Shore at lake level.) 

But the upper elevations are heavy with snow. Our season total at our house was around 40 feet. The official measurements at the tops of the ski areas were season totals of 65 feet. Squaw Valley had to dig tunnels down to the chairlifts so that riders could get up the mountain as if riding along a walled-in snow road. Squaw announced that they will be open until July 4th. There has even been talk of them not closing at all and staying open continuously through the summer and fall, a season that would stretch 18 months until spring of 2018. They probably won't, but it will be because of lack of skiers, not snow. 

Every time the temperature goes up a bit, the weather service issues flood warnings, and the rivers and creeks are at the top of their banks with snowmelt. 

On June 8th, we hiked up to Angora Lookout. It is only 7000 feet of elevation, yet the clouds were swirling. The temp was in the 40s. Cold rain soaked us. Looking down at Fallen Leaf Lake, we could see snow patches still lingering at Stanford Camp, elevation 6400. Looking across at Mt. Tallac, elevation 9735 feet, the summit was obscured by a snowstorm. Because the temperature drops 3 to 4 degrees for every thousand feet of elevation rise, Tallac's summit was probably about 30 degrees. And it will drop to the high teens overnight. The precip is supposed to continue, so we'll wake up to fresh white on the mountains.

When we get high wind warnings and gusts to 35 down at lake level, as forecast this day, the Sierra crest often gets 100 mile-per-hour gusts, sometimes much more.

Which means, the summit of Tallac was experiencing a blizzard during the photo below.

Waves of snow sweep across the sky.
At center left on the photo, there are still snow patches down at Stanford Camp.
The summit of Mt. Tallac is obscured by a June blizzard.
I wouldn't want to be up there!
The next day, June 9th, I gave a talk to the Incline Village Golf Club. I took another picture of Mt. Tallac, this time from 20 miles away. In the picture, Tallac is the mountain on the far shore with sunlight shining on the snow fields. The day was blustery. There were multiple showers. In conditions like this, rain showers look gray. Snow showers look white. So it appeared that the heavy shower to the right of Tallac was snow. Later on the 9th, I looked at the weather forecast. On Sunday (when this blog will post), they are predicting snow for Tahoe. Life in the mountains is Fun!

Mt. Tallac as seen from the Northwest Shore, 20 miles distant. The showers to the right are snow falling over the water.



Sunday, June 4, 2017

The Hardest Part Of Writing, Part Two

Last week, I left off with my poor, lonely first novel, floundering out there in a vast, rough sea. Agents and editors were cruising in life boats, but they weren't going to take a chance at hoisting me aboard.

But if an agent or editor had responded to my novel, they might have said that my prose was purple, full of adjectives and, worse, adverbs. My dialogue tags also included the dreaded adverbs and called attention to themselves instead of being invisible helpers. My points of view jumped around from character to character within any given scene, destroying any ability of the reader to identify with a single character. My tense moments were filled with passive verbs instead of active verbs. And those same tense scenes had long, languorous, run-on sentences, taking all the brisk tension out of the scene. My dialogue was so realistic that it was like, what do you call it, totally, you know, um, whatever, boring, I guess. I had multiple scenes where there was no conflict or trouble. My hero wasn't sufficiently sympathetic for the reader to care. It took three chapters of stage setting to get to the beginning of my story. The bad guy had no believable motivation and read like a cartoon character. My other characters showed no emotion. The violence was cheap and sensational. My single love scene was cheap and sensational. It appeared that my characters had vision, i.e., they could see, but they couldn't smell or hear or touch or feel. The most important plot points hadn't been foreshadowed, so they just fell out of the blue and, hence, were unbelievable. Even worse, things happened by coincidence. Here and there I'd used big vocabulary words for no apparent purpose other than to make my book seem smart. My book had nothing to teach a reader. And possibly no reader would want to spend much time in this world I'd created because there were few redeeming qualities to my story or my characters.

I can go on. But you get the picture.

In many if not most of the arts, it's very easy for an amateur and expert alike to make an immediate assessment of quality and be fairly accurate. But with any writing at the level of someone who's actually succeeded in completing a novel, it's very difficult to make that assessment. It's especially difficult for the writer to judge his or her own writing because the writer's perception is completely shaped by their internal sense of the story they were trying to write. A writer doesn't see what they wrote. They see what they think they wrote.

So how does one get past this difficulty? By writing lots and lots and lots. You need to put in ten thousand hours at it. Very few writers create a good novel the first time they write one. In fact, most of the one-book wonders out there actually wrote a great deal of fiction before that "first novel." They may have written under a pseudonym as well. The public never knew what was still in their drawer. Most writers have to put in the equivalent of writing multiple novels before they start to develop the skills to do it well or even to simply judge it clearly.

As I've often said. You wouldn't think of putting on your first pair of figure skates and performing spinning leaps. Nor should you think you're going to produce a great novel on your first attempt.

While it's easy to judge if a figure skater is doing it well, even when the judge is a novice figure skater, it's very hard to judge if a novel is any good.

It's possible that, more than any other art, writing requires editors. Sure, a painter can benefit from the critique of a trained art teacher. But when a good painter finishes a canvas, he or she can often tell if it's good. Whereas, in writing, the input of editors is critical. It may be that the single greatest mistake novice writers make is to forego getting/hiring editors. (If you are relatively new to this writing gig, note that all professional writers use editors. It is only an amateur writer who doesn't hire a professional editor or three. And most readers recognize that by the end of the first page of their novel.)

This is also why very few successful writers think of writing as a one-book effort. They plan, from the very beginning, to write a shelf full of books. They put in enormous amounts of time.

After enough practice, that hardest part of writing gets easy. Once they can see the full picture of what makes for decent writing, it becomes much easier to do it.

If writers are persistent enough, the rewards are great. They live in a fascinating internal landscape. Many live in fascinating external landscapes. They are never bored. Never. They get to live by their own terms and their own schedule. They have no boss. And, for some writers, they even earn good money making up stories.

I highly recommend it.

Okay, time for me to go work on some fiction.




Sunday, May 28, 2017

The Hardest Part Of Writing? That's Easy.

I learned about this "hardest part of writing" back when I wrote my first novel, which is still in a drawer along with three other novels. The hardest part of writing is, simply, that it is very difficult for a novice writer to know if their writing is any good. Actually, it's also hard for an experienced writer to make an accurate judgment of their own writing.

To explain, please allow me to digress.

Imagine you just painted your first painting, a portrait done in oil. You hang it up on the wall between a portrait done by Rembrandt and a portrait done by Sargent, and you compare. Your first thought will be something like, Whoa, those other painters are way mo' bettuh. It will be painfully obvious that you've a very long way to go.

Now imagine you've just written your first symphony. Afterward, you listen to a Beethoven symphony, then yours, then a symphony by Mozart. Whoa, that's also harsh. In fact, it doesn't even seem like the same kind of art.

Let's try something less grand than a symphony or an oil portrait. You've downloaded sound recording software, got out your acoustic guitar, and sang and recorded your first song, a song you've been working on for months. After listening to it, you put on Joni Mitchell or James Taylor or Beyonce. Ouch.

People have always told you that you're a good dancer. (Kind of like the way people always told you that you were good with words.) So even though you haven't had specific training, you choreograph a piece and hire a dance troupe to perform it. Later, you watch the same group perform a dance by Twyla Tharp. You immediately think that maybe you should just be happy being an accountant.

Okay, last comparison. You just finished writing your first mystery and you set it on the table next to ones by Patricia Highsmith, Agatha Christie, John D. MacDonald, and Edgar Allen Poe. You flip through the pages of each.

Hey, this is a lot better than comparing paintings and music and dance performances and orchestral compositions. Sure, you can see some things the masters did that you make a note of to try yourself. But all things considered, your mystery seems pretty good. Just like the others, you've got a character in trouble, and a very nasty bad guy, and you've got a nice variety of scenes, and there's that real tense sequence at the end where it looks like your hero is going to die. While it's obvious that your second novel will be much better, your first is looking good, right? Even when it sits next to those by the masters, right?

Then you send it to an agent or a publishing house and hope that someone pulls it out of the slush pile and recognizes its genius.

Here's what happened to me. When I sent out my first book, agents and editors didn't respond except to send me little pink or green slips that said, 'Dear Sir or Madam. Thank you for your submission. Unfortunately, it doesn't meet our needs at this time. Good luck placing your work elsewhere.'

Why didn't my first novel make the grade?

Tune in next week for Part Two.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Sneak Preview... Tahoe Payback!

It's not yet on my website...
It hasn't even been printed...
But it's done. Edited. And the cover is finished.
(Thank you, editors and cover designer!)
My new book is called:
TAHOE PAYBACK

Here's the scoop.

A distraught man asks Owen McKenna to find his missing girlfriend. When McKenna investigates, he discovers that the woman's body was found hanging by her ankles, the line stretched up and over the top of the tea house on Fannette Island, the only island on Lake Tahoe. The woman had three red roses taped into her mouth and a rose necklace and a rose-themed haiku stuffed into her cheeks.

After some serious gumshoe exercise, McKenna finds out that the woman ran a scam charity and used it to steal millions.

While McKenna and his Great Dane Spot work the streets, they learn of two more victims who also ran fraudulent charities. They, too, were hanging by their ankles.

Meanwhile, McKenna's girlfriend Street Casey believes her ex-con, parole-skipping father wants to punish her for her testimony that helped put him prison 20 years ago. Street has McKenna teaching her about self defense. Not just the basics, but the really nasty stuff that only ex-cops know about.

McKenna and Street are both about to encounter someone who wants them very dead...


TAHOE PAYBACK will be out August 1st. I'll be doing the usual series of appearances, talks, and signings beginning at the end of July. Artifacts in Tahoe, Sundance in Reno, Shelby's in Minden, Geared for Games in Tahoe City, Browsers Books in Carson City, Word After Word Books in Truckee. You get the idea. I'll do a blogpost with those dates. And those of you who've written and asked to be on my email list will get an email about my schedule.

Thank you very much for your continued interest and support!

Oh yeah, Tahoe Payback is available for pre-order, both paper book and ebook. Here's the link to the paper book: TAHOE PAYBACK
Here's the link to the ebook: TAHOE PAYBACK
(Eventually, Amazon will merge both paper and ebook onto the same page.)

I think you will find this book the perfect beach read, or late-at-night-under-your-covers read, or gift for anyone on your list who likes mysteries, or travel-appropriate read for anyone who likes Tahoe.

Enjoy!!!


Sunday, May 14, 2017

The Greatest Bike Race In America. The Greatest Bike Racers In The World.

Women racers circling Tahoe in Stage 1 of the Amgen Tour of California.
Too bad they couldn't find a scenic place to hold the race!


Hey everybody, pull up a cushion or chair, sit back, and I'll tell you a story about some amazing young women who are part of a group of bicycle racers kicking butt in the road racing world. These women set Tahoe bike racing on fire three days ago. Unlike lots of what I write, this story won't be fiction. It will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

On Thursday, May 11, the Amgen Tour of California began here in Tahoe. The Amgen Tour is a 10-day bike race throughout the state and is regarded by many as the most important race in the country. The tour runs in four stages (races) for women and seven stages for men. The stages take place all over California and add up to many hundreds of miles. Think Tour de France California style.

The opening race was the women racing around Lake Tahoe. 72 miles with lots of elevation gain and loss.

Nearly 100 of the best women racers in the world, coming from 20 countries, started at Heavenly Resort and rode around Lake Tahoe in about the same time it takes to drive around the lake! As they finished, the winner was Megan Guarnier, an American who races for the Boels-Dolmans Cycling Team from The Netherlands. No surprise there, as Megan won the overall Tour of California last year. She is, by every measure, one of the racing world's biggest stars. In second place, just 8 seconds behind, was Anna van der Breggen, a powerful racer from The Netherlands and one of Megan's teammates. It was a spectacular race.

This is when the racers first appeared as they approached Emerald Bay.



Part of bike racing strategy is to stay back in the group so the group leaders do the work of blocking the wind. Teammates help each other out by shielding the one they think has the best chance of breaking free from the group and carrying that momentum to the finish and possibly win. Racing strategy is complex, making it very hard to predict the winner.
(A group of bike racers is called a "Peloton," French for "platoon.")
The next day was the second race, 68 miles with huge climbs and descents. This circuit was a tortuous loop that went from Heavenly, out through the South Shore, up over Luther Pass at 7740 feet, down through Hope Valley and then down to Carson Valley at 4700 feet of elevation. The racers then climbed up Kingsbury Grade, a 2,800-foot ascent to Daggett Pass, rode back down to Lake Tahoe, and then back up the final ascent to Heavenly.

The first racers coming down from Luther Pass toward Hope Valley. How fast were they going?
I don't know, but it was FAST. 50 mph? 60 mph?

The curve they were approaching wasn't sharp (just to the left of this photo). But their speed required them to lean hard into the turn.

A few hours ago as I write this on Friday, May 12th, I was at the finish line at Heavenly Resort as the second race was nearing the finish. 

The announcer was getting race reports in his headset and was passing the information on to the crowd. He spoke loudly into the microphone, his excitement contagious as he relayed the information that Anna van der Breggen, the second place finisher from the day before, was in the lead. But it turned out that another racer, an American named Katie Hall was coming up from behind. Known as a hill climber without equal, Katie Hall had apparently demolished the crowd on the Kingsbury Grade ascent. However, she is apparently not as fast as some racers on the level and on the descents. As they came down the lake side of Kingsbury and headed toward the final climb, Anna had taken a strong lead.

The announcer's words were something like, "The latest report is that Katie Hall is launching an attack on Anna van der Breggen's lead. Katie's approaching from behind. If she can narrow Anna's lead just enough, then Katie can possibly catch her when they get to the final ascent, which is Katie's specialty." 

"Anna van der Breggen knows she has to maintain a good lead in order to win. If she doesn't have enough distance on Katie Hall, Hall might power past her on the climb."

"Now Katie has caught up to Anna van der Breggen!  They are just two K out, on the final climb to the finish. Anna is an amazing racer. But Katie Hall, who races for UnitedHealthcare Professional Cycling Team, is known for being a climber. She has an astonishing ability to power up mountains."

The announcer was now shouting. 

"Now Katie Hall has pulled ahead of Anna van der Breggen. Katie Hall is the lead! Nothing can stop this woman! She is a climbing star! Okay folks, she's now five seconds ahead of Anna. She's moving faster. Increasing her lead. Wait, I've just been told she's opened her lead to ten seconds. These women have already climbed and descended six thousand feet in this race. Luther Pass. Kingsbury Grade. The climb up to Heavenly. Kingsbury alone is almost three thousand feet of vertical rise in just seven miles. Hold on, everybody. Katie Hall's lead has increased to fifteen seconds! This is amazing! She will be coming into view any moment. Folks, this is one of the most amazing finishes in Amgen California Tour history!"

At that moment, down where the final stretch turns into the Heavenly finish lane, the crowd saw a patrol car appear, light bar flashing. Next to it was an official car and a race-official on a motorcycle. The flashing lights got brighter, then pulled off to give the entire lane to Katie.

"There she is!" The announcer shouted. "Katie Hall's lead is still increasing! She's now ahead twenty seconds, so much that she could possibly pull into the overall tour lead and earn the coveted yellow jersey!"

We all squinted against the sun, which reflected off the vehicles and the distant snow-capped mountains. Mt. Tallac loomed over the western side of Lake Tahoe, its jagged cliffs and brilliant snowfields demanding attention. Behind Tallac, the Sierra Crest ridge line was a row of 10,000-foot saw teeth. In front of that spectacular view, heat waves off the pavement made the patrol car shimmer. The red and blue flashes danced, rising a step, wavering to the side, then coming back into position like a mirage that couldn't be trusted.

We stared. The crowd hushed.

Through the mirage, a tiny figure gradually emerged.

"Folks, Katie Hall is coming down the stretch! She seems to be accelerating. She's still increasing her lead!"

As the racer approached, wearing a blue jersey, we sensed the rapid pulse of her legs and feet churning into a circular blur. The crowd started cheering.


Katie Hall coming first over the finish line. An attending motorcycle follows her because she is all alone out front of the group.

There seemed to be a kind of group surprise about the image taking shape down the stretch, an awareness that this person who was winning the race was so small as to be shocking. The racer approaching at high speed was nothing like the conquering, muscular athlete we'd imagined. She was closer to a diminutive Nike, a small, winged goddess of victory.

There is a kind of disconnect in these situations. When we see a victor like Katie Hall, we tend to categorize her into the dancer or gymnast box, a tiny athlete who can do amazing things. But then, when we reconsider what she's done... when we realize that, but for a few elite male bike racers, she can blow every male bike racer wannabe off the road, we get a sense of the enormity of her accomplishment.

(Hey, male bike riders, feel good about your accomplishments. Be proud that you're in shape. Bask in the joy of getting out and pointing your bicycle up the mountains while your friends are sitting in front of the TV. But the next time you see a tiny woman out on her two-wheeler, working up a sweat, don't ever, ever think that she's "pretty good for a girl." And never dare suggest a challenge to her about who could ride up the next hill first. Because if you do, and if anyone's around to witness, they'll engrave "Here Lies a Fool" on your gravestone.)

The crowd roared as Katie flashed by.

Katie Hall has won a ton of races. She's in the top tier of women racers worldwide. Today, she did it again. She took on a grueling race, climbing up mountains at high altitude, and she crushed the competition and was all alone as she came through through the finish. Anna, pedaling very fast, appeared down the finish lane and came in second, repeating her standing in the previous day's race.

Katie's win was so pronounced that her combined times for two days of racing put her in the overall lead, winning the coveted yellow jersey.

When she took the podium and received her award, the cheering began again. We all knew we had witnessed something we'd be talking about it for years.


Katie Hall's combined times for two days of racing earn her the number one position and the coveted yellow jersey.

As this blog "goes to press," the Stage 3 race just concluded in Sacramento. The overall rankings have Katie Hall, Anna van der Breggen, and Megan Guarnier in first, second, and third place, with only ONE SECOND separating Katie and Anna! Sunday's 4th stage will tell who wins the overall First Place! Check out the lastest on the Amgen Tour of California website here.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

In Tahoe, May Is A Winter Month

Yes, we've had some nice spring weather in the last couple of weeks. But we don't let that fool us.

Six times in the past, I've done outdoor shows in Tahoe on Memorial Day. Five of those times it snowed. Once, it was a lot of snow.

So today, Saturday, May 6th, was no surprise when the snow came in fast and furious. I'm not kidding when I say that the flakes conglomerated into golf ball-sized artillery. It didn't hurt when they struck. But they covered me in white in the time it took to run from the car into the grocery store.

Don't get me wrong. We'll take this record snow that has filled up the lake and inundated our soil. Our road has developed a gushing spring. A hole opened up in the middle of the asphalt and water flows 24-7. Nearby roads have turned into continuous small creeks. Squaw Valley and Mt. Rose ski areas have recorded season totals over 60 feet. At our house, our season total was, perhaps, only 40 feet. We still have 8 feet on the north side of the house. My full-time job of snow removal is over. But I won't soon forget what it's like.
Shoveling into our house back in 2011 and again this year.

Here's to the coming summer!

Sunday, April 30, 2017

The Advice I Wish I'd Gotten When I Was 18

I didn't like high school. I got through it by focusing on music and skiing and riding my bicycle. I never had a broad outlook on education. Unfortunately, when I went on to the university, I still didn't have a big picture of education. I tried some different subjects and even went so far as to major in Pre-med (because I was good at the sciences). But that approach didn't take.

I'm happier now as a writer than I've ever been. But I wish I'd gotten focused on this novel business at a younger age. What would have provided a focus sooner? I knew that a broad education was valuable. But when I was young, I needed something more concrete. Something that, for me, would have explained the dichotomy between common knowledge and uncommon knowledge.

It would have helped if someone I respected had said something like, "You can't just hang out and hope a good life or a good job comes along. It is best to plan. And the best plan is to look at all the things you might like to do, and then study the ones that give you uncommon knowledge."

Perhaps that is obvious. But the obvious often escapes me.

The desired sage advice would have gone on with specifics: "The more common your knowledge and skill, the harder it will be to find an interesting, well-paid career. The more uncommon your knowledge and skill, the easier it will be to earn a living in an interesting way."

The advice would have included examples:

"If you become very good at skiing (a somewhat common skill), you can teach it. But you won't be able to charge much or find many takers because tons of people are good skiers. In contrast, if you become very good at brain surgery (an uncommon skill), you can explore some of the most interesting stuff known to man. And you will be in high demand because of the rarity of your knowledge. A bonus is that you'll likely get wealthy in the process."

"If you get very good at waiting tables or tending bar (a somewhat common skill), you can always find a job, which, unfortunately, often doesn't pay well. But if you get very good at being a professional chef (an uncommon skill), you might be able to start your own successful restaurant."

"If you spend a great deal of time watching TV, you'll learn the latest TV trivia and celebrity gossip (very common knowledge), and you will have spent much of your life acquiring knowledge that has almost no value. But if you learn how to write and/or produce those TV shows (uncommon knowledge), you will be able to work in the television field creating the content that so many millions enjoy.

A corollary to creating TV content would be that if you know how to write novels (less common knowledge), you can tell stories about most anything you like and maybe earn a living from it as well and work on your own terms and your own schedule and rarely have to get on the freeway during rush hour."

If only someone I respected had told me that at 18. Oh, well, we figure these things out in time...

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Writers, Be Careful With Your Bad Guys...

In the world of fiction, it sometimes seems that the only kind of Bad Guy that doesn't get a writer in trouble is a white, male lawyer or doctor in his 40s or 50s. If you move very far from that model, watch out.

In one of my books, the "Bad Guy" was a lesbian. The fact that she was lesbian had nothing to do with her being the antagonist in my book. Yet I got hate mail. After saying some nasty things about me, the person added, "Being a lesbian doesn't make you more inclined to be a murderer."

Of course not. A person murders because they are evil or because they are pushed up against an unmovable wall and see no way out other than murder. I think I made it very clear that my "Bad person" was bad for reasons that have nothing to do with gender preference. But I learned an important lesson. Some people are extremely sensitive about certain characteristics that have made people prejudiced against them.

People who belong to groups that have rarely suffered prejudice or have even benefited from privilege that comes from belonging to such groups may not be so sensitive if a Bad Guy appears to come from their group.

But lots of people are part of groups that have suffered prejudice. At the very least, that prejudice is insensitive and unfair, and it brings people pain. At the worst, members of such groups have been subject to unspeakable acts that can't be described in a PG-13 blog. So we need to walk softly if we identify a Bad Guy as belonging to any groups that have suffered from bigotry. We don't walk softly only because we're afraid of the reaction we might get. We walk softly because it is the right, thoughtful, sensitive thing to do.

There is an emerging flip side to this as well. If you identify your Bad Guy as a member of one of innumerable groups that are known for promoting hateful prejudice, you may incur that group's wrath as well. The last thing an author wants is for the wacko (fill in the name of one of the many hate groups here) to come after them.

As always, your Bad Guy does his nastiness because he's evil, not because of the groups he or she can be associated with. But not everyone will realize that. Some people will draw a connection.

You can give your novel's antagonist any kind of characteristics. But do it thoughtfully. And make it clear that those characteristics are incidental to the Bad Guy's motivation and have no connection to the cause of it.

If you're not sure you can pull this off such that your reader is confident you're playing fair with your Bad Guys, then you can always fall back on a white, male doctor or lawyer in his 40s or 50s... 




Sunday, April 16, 2017

The Rule All Writers Eventually Break

Writers always hear the advice, Write What You Know. It's a great idea. We are more likely to "get it correct" if we know whereof we speak.

Unfortunately, it doesn't work for very long.

I started out writing about stuff I knew about. By the time I finished my 3rd book, I'd used up all my knowledge. I'd plumbed nearly every subject in which I was a bit expert. I'd utilized most of the character types with which I was familiar.

To keep going, a writer needs to move into unfamiliar territory.

How do you delve into unfamiliar subjects? Read. Google every relevant question you can think of. Interview experts. Find beta readers who know the subject and can tell you what you got wrong. Due diligence will get you through any territory.

Sometimes the advice goes beyond subjects and ideas and is extended to ridiculous extremes. People will say that a writer can't write convincingly about about a character from a background that's dramatically different than the writer's background.

For example, I'm a middle-aged, straight, white guy, born in America, married a long time, no kids, somewhat educated, never poverty stricken, with no physical disabilities. (When I can't remember the names of people I've known for ten years, the question of mental disability does comes up!)

So how could I presume to write a character who is dramatically different from my background?

Research. Empathy. Careful thought.

I know lots of people who aren't very much like me. By paying attention, I can reasonably get a sense of what it might be like to be a person very different from me. If I'm thoughtful, I can create a wide range of characters.

Of course, a writer needs to be thoughtful and sensitive, especially if a character from a very different background turns out to be an unsavory person. One doesn't want to offend readers. Provoke them? Sure. Get them to question their own presumptions? Definitely. But all characters need to be treated fairly and accurately.

Which brings us to the question of Bad Guys. Or what writers call the story's antagonist. How do you handle it if the Bad Guy in your story belongs to a group of people who regularly suffer from prejudice?

Tune in next week.

Sunday, April 9, 2017

The One Cliché A Writer Can Never Ignore

Wanna be a writer?

As writers, we learn to avoid clichés at all cost. (Oops, there's a cliché) But there is one cliché we should never forget.

Writers write.



You can talk about writing, take classes about writing, think about writing, get together with other writers and discuss writing. You can even book passage to the next major writing conference or convention and lose yourself for days learning about writing and meeting writers and readers. But even at those events, you'll notice that real writers write.

At the recent Left Coast Crime in Honolulu, this maxim was on full display. I kept hearing people saying things like, "I couldn't make the early-morning panel because I had to finish my thousand words."

As with all such events, there were wannabes in attendance. That is to be expected and desired. If you want a career as a writer, you need to sample these things, meet the serious writers, and see what makes them tick. (Oops, another cliché)

If you're paying attention at such an event, you'll notice that a large proportion of the most successful writers (try 100%) write continuously, devoting a substantial portion of every day or week to writing. Not talking about it. Doing it.

If you look at successful writers, you'll find that the only thing they all have in common is that they've written a lot of books. (Yes, there are exceptions, but they are very rare. And some of them aren't really exceptions, i.e., the one book wonder who turns out to have written two dozen novels under a pseudonym.)

At Left Coast Crime, I hosted a panel with four of the finalists for Best Humorous Mystery award. Between these four writers, they'd written a combined total of 60 mysteries. It doesn't take much arithmetic expertise to figure out that these writers have together put in something like 30 to 60 years of full time work writing.

Hmmm.

What is the hallmark of a successful brain surgeon? She's done lots of surgery. What makes for the kind of pilot who can put a plane with dead engines down on a river without losing a single passenger? Lots of flying. How did that fabulous waitperson get so good at waiting tables? Waiting a lot of tables. How in the world does a figure skater learn to do a triple salchow? By putting in more hours at the rink than you can count.

So if you want to be a writer... Yep, pay attention to that cliché.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

A Lesson From Lee Goldberg

During the Left Coast Crime 2017 convention in Hawaii, there were several dozens of notable moments, many of them worth remembering for writers. One of these was a statement that Lee Goldberg made during a panel.

Author Lee Goldberg
You are probably familiar with Goldberg's work even if you don't know his name. He created and/or worked on many popular TV shows including Diagnosis: Murder, Hunter, Spenser: For Hire, Monk and more.

He's also written something like 30 novels including the Diagnosis: Murder series, the Monk series, the Fox & O'Hare series that he writes with Janet Evanovich, and many others. The man is a writing dynamo.

The comment Goldberg made that struck me was when he said that "There is more story in a single TV episode today than there was in an entire season of a show back in the seventies."

For those of us in the story-telling business (especially those of us who were around in the '70s), Goldberg's statement is startling. It sums up what has happened in commercial storytelling. People want more story. Much more story.

Is this because we've all been so impacted by the profusion of inputs that only a fast-moving story will keep our attention? Probably. (I remember well the days when there were just three networks on TV, and everybody watched the same news at night - Walter Cronkite.)

Despite this new sound-bite world where a slow character-focused story has a hard time gaining attention, it's also likely that people are simply hard-wired to gravitate toward more story. We love a story that gives us many twists and turns. More of that is more exciting.

Two recent experiences made this real for me.

Back in the day, I devoured each Robert Ludlum novel as they came out. I recently reread his Bourne Identity. It was originally published in 1980. Rereading it 36 years later, it seemed rich and dense and fabulously plotted... And SLOW.

Yikes, what a terrible thing to think about a book I originally thought was fast and filled with action!

Another example: Not long ago, my wife and I rented the movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The film stars Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and Katherine Ross. It was a smash hit when it came out in 1969, the kind of film that many people saw multiple times for the excitement generated by a fast-moving plot and charismatic, beautiful movie stars.

On seeing it again 45 years later we still found it wonderful... But SLOW.

Double yikes.

Lee Goldberg is dead on with his comment.

What exactly is the "story" he refers to? If current shows have more story than an entire season of shows in the '70s, what does that really mean?

I don't think the answer is particularly clear. But the best definition of "story" is "what happens." This mostly means plot. Yes, character growth and transformation is something that "happens." And those character qualities haven't changed. It's the plot part of stories that have shifted into high gear.

So, while we still need to have compelling characters who draw you into their trouble, we more than ever need stuff to happen.

Of course, there will always be readers who want "literary" fiction, stories that delve into complex characters, stories where the major action is when characters make internal discoveries and conflict is quiet, no car chases desired.

But commercial fiction has always had more action and twists and turns. This characteristic goes Way back. Just read Shakespeare. The difference today is that the action and twists and turns have to come at a much faster pace to keep readers happy.

This isn't as easy to do as it is to state. Many writers struggle with plot, sometimes complaining that they have a hard time simply plotting their way out of a paper bag.

Years ago I thought plot was the easier part of the plot-vs-character dichotomy. Now I think it's the harder part. But from now on, I'm going to keep Lee Goldberg's words in my head as I write.



Sunday, March 26, 2017

Left Coast Crime - What An Experience!


Last week, my wife and I attended the Left Coast Crime 2017 convention in Hawaii. Four days of great panels and talks. Just shy of 500 people, all fans of mystery novels, readers and authors alike. It was a rush of inputs, all valuable, many exciting, such as meeting authors whose books I've been reading for decades. I also met fans who are SERIOUS readers and dedicated to supporting mystery writers. Some of these fans are the book-a-day devotees who in many respects know the world of mysteries better than those of us who write them.

We writers draw sustenance from these readers. They support us in this business of making up stories for a living. And we learn from them, too.

My thanks to all of them.

If you are a fan of mysteries, you will likely find such a convention a great experience. There were over 70 panels where authors talked about writing and answered questions from readers. (I served on 2 panels.) I listened to many panels and all were informative and often funny. Even for writers, it's fascinating to hear raconteurs telling stories about how they tell stories.

At the closing panel...Famous authors from our left to right:
Lee Goldberg, Collin Cotterill, Faye Kellerman, Jonathan Kellerman, Dana Stabenow, and Laurie King.

Left Coast Crime was also instructive to me because I've been chosen to be the Toastmaster at Left Coast Crime 2018 in Reno. I hope to see you all there!
Click here to go to the LCC 2018 website

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Writers Beware. For Some Kids, This Profession Does Not Compute.

I got out of snow country for a little bit and found myself sitting on a bench on the American River in Sacramento, computer on my lap, working on my 2018 Owen McKenna mystery. (The August 2017 installment is currently in the editing pipeline. More on that in a future post.)

While we are still in winter at home for another two-plus months, this river in the Central Valley was rushing with snow melt, trees were in blossom, and a thousand birds were excited about spring.

Along came a school class with an eager teacher telling her students about those birds. After they began to move on, a girl left the group and walked toward me. She was about ten years old, wore large, tortoise-shell glasses, and she looked studious. It was clear from her inquisitive look that she was very bright and engaged.

When she got near me, she looked at my laptop computer and asked, "Are you a scientist?" Her tone was one of anticipation and her face was bright with enthusiasm. Imagine how exciting it would be to meet a real-life scientist.

I said, "No, I'm a writer."

She frowned, and the corners of her mouth dropped in disappointment.

To offer a clarification that might make her feel better about my profession, I said, "I write books."

At that, confusion seemed to join with severe letdown. She scrunched up her face in wrinkled dismay. She might as well have said, 'Why on earth would anyone do something so dumb?!'

Instead, she said nothing. She turned away and walked back to her group, shoulders slumped, her body language suggesting that I'd just taken all the joy out of life.

So, writers, be prepared. Your profession may go down well with some kids. But with others... Not so much!


Sunday, March 12, 2017

From 12 Feet Of Snow To Palm Trees In 80 Minutes

Yes, there are a few other places in the world that get as much snow as Tahoe. Not a lot of them. But they're out there. (As of this writing, the Mt. Rose snow survey shows 650 inches of snow has fallen as of March 1st. That's 54 feet.)

The snow gets so deep, you can't see to pull out onto the road. Your back and arms get brutalized by shoveling. Your snowblower can't always throw it high enough to get over the banks. And when you go a few days without fresh snow, those banks near the highway get nasty with dirt.



 



So what do you do? Whenever possible, you head to palm tree country. (Which we just did.)

Yes, there are other places in the world that have palm trees like much of California.



But there are very few places on the planet where you can drive from massive amounts of snow to palm trees in 80 minutes, the time it takes to cruise down the mountain from Donner Summit (Hwy 80) or Echo Summit (Hwy 50).

In California, not only is snow optional and easy to escape (like many mountains around the world), but the climate just down the road is warm enough for palm trees (unlike most mountains wherever you go).

We live in an amazing place.

Sunday, March 5, 2017

California Drought?

Four or five years in the making.
One year in the unmaking.
Was it random chaos? Were the weather gods just testing us? Or is this the new weather gyrations of climate change?
Whatever, Californians are tired of shoveling and tired of jumping into kayaks when the town floods. But, all things considered, we'll take it.

The drought map one year ago...


The drought map today...

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Starting Your Story With An Earthquake

The famous movie impresario Samuel Goldwyn (the “G” in MGM) said, “I want a story that starts out with an earthquake… and THEN builds to a climax!”

Ol’ Sam knew something about pulling people into a story.

As you know, Clint Eastwood also knows something about pulling people into a story.

My wife and I recently saw the Clint Eastwood-directed movie Sully, about airline pilot Captain Sullenberger. Sully, played by Tom Hanks in the movie, had to make a forced landing right after takeoff from LaGuardia Airport in New York City.  A flock of birds suddenly flew into the path of the airliner, destroying both of the engines on the plane. (Sorry about that, birds!)

After thirty seconds of engine tests and emergency diagnostics, Sully realized two things. First, his engines were toast, and he had to make a very careful emergency landing if he had any hope of saving the 155 passengers. Two, he didn’t have enough altitude to be able to glide back to the airport. So he landed in the Hudson River and didn’t lose a single life.



From the standpoint of a storyteller, this movie is fascinating to watch because the tense process of putting the plane down in the river only took a bit over a minute. How does one make a 90-minute movie out of one minute of action? Another challenge is that everyone who sees the movie (or read the book it was based on) already knows the outcome of the story. Yet a third difficulty is how to draw people into a story they already know.

It turns out that Eastwood took seriously Samuel Goldwyn’s desire for a story that starts with a bang. We barely hit the play button on the DVD when we see Tom Hanks in the cockpit as the birds strike the plane. He immediately begins preparations for an emergency landing.

Talk about starting with an earthquake.

All of us authors should make a mental note of this movie and its beginning. When we begin a story, we so often think we need to “set the stage” and explain to our readers who our characters are so that when the trouble starts, the reader will care about the characters because they already know them.

Eastwood shows in a powerful “earthquake” manner that we don’t need to know characters at all in the beginning.

If you want to grab your reader, put your characters in deep, deep trouble as early in the story as possible. The trouble makes us care about the characters who are struggling with it. The reader will eventually come to know your characters in the way you desire, no previous “stage setting” necessary. And perhaps readers will care even more because of the trouble your characters are in came on so strong and so fast.

Most important of all, when your characters get into bad trouble from the beginning, the reader is much more likely to stay with the story and not turn away looking for a “grabbier” story.

Take a look - or another look - at the movie Sully and see just how Eastwood does it. It’s a powerful lesson in storytelling.

P.S. Let's not forget what the real Sully did. Wow.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Self Publishing - What Not To Do Part 3

The last two weeks, I wrote about the worst way to self publish your books. The problem basically boils down to signing over your publication rights to a so-called "self publishing" publisher, which is technically anything but.

I've spoken to more writers who signed on with "self-publishing" publishers than I can count. These writers - like all writers - are universally smart, earnest, focused, dedicated, skillful writers. They have great ideas and great execution. They reasonably believe that the best focus for their limited time is the books they are writing, not the mechanisms to bring those books to the marketplace.

Unfortunately, this is a big error in judgment. Because they aren't driving their own writing/publishing/marketing vehicle, their books are just one more set of titles in a company that has hundreds or thousands of authors. And at whatever sales level these authors create, their so-called publishing company takes a critical portion of the money off the top, yet they still don't help those writers sell books. How can you tell?

Easy. When you find a compelling "self-publishing" company, go through their catalog and write down the titles and authors of their books. Pick out dozens of them. Or hundreds of them. Now look up those same books on Amazon. What are their sales ranking? (Remember, a sales ranking of #1 means the top-selling book at Amazon. A sales ranking of 100,000 means that 99,999 titles sell better. The lower the number, the better the book sells.) When you look at the sales ranking of all the books you've written down, you'll quickly see that most are over 500,000. Many are over a million. Some way over. That tells you how successful/unsuccessful the publisher is at selling books.

How can authors who signed over publication rights to a company that pays no advance and yet doesn't sell many books ever hope to compete with the real self-published authors? The simple answer is that they can't. Because real self-published authors have a full-time, or even double-time, person working exclusively on the publishing and marketing of their own books. Themselves. Their efforts are rewarded by being able to keep all of the profit. And their efforts aren't diluted by having to focus on other writers.

Self-published authors who have complete control over their work are nimble and faster and more motivated. They don't have to get any permission to make this little change or that adjustment in their story or on their book cover. When they see a promotion opportunity, they can jump on it. When a group, corporate or social or otherwise, asks for their participation in an event and they need to show up with 100 books, they can immediately accept. And every one of these things that they do puts more money in their pocket, not someone else's pocket.

Of course, many writers think that they don't have time to figure all this stuff out. So just pay the money, and the next thing you know, their book is for sale on Amazon. Yay. They're in the big time. Never mind that their books might not make any money.

Further - and this is a big point - these writers look at "real" self-published authors and see that most of them don't make money, either! Same for New York-published authors. So who cares what approach one takes?

I can't argue with that. As I said in my caveat at the beginning of this rant two weeks ago, if you're happy with your choices, great.

But because only a small percentage of writers earn a good living from writing, it's worth it to take a close look at them. Some of them have established long careers with New York publishers. It's a tough gig - the Authors Guild reports that the average New York-published author makes $17,000 a year - but it can be done. And an increasing number of authors earning a good living are self-published. But, as far as I can see, all of those self-published authors are true self-published authors, in control of their own career, with no other people between them and their readers.

The bottom line is this. If you want to have a chance at joining that small percentage - authors who earn a good living - wouldn't you choose one of the approaches that they all use? Yet many writers choose an approach that no successful authors use. Why?

Is figuring out how to be a real self publisher hard work? Absolutely. It takes a lot of research to learn what is necessary to truly self publish. Writing your book was hard work, too. As was studying for and developing your previous work career. You wouldn't have turned over control of your previous career to someone else to make all the decisions. You did it all yourself, going directly to the people who paid you money for your services. And your efforts and focus on every aspect of that career were important to your success.

Like any research project, start by Googling your questions. Then expect to read a hundred blogs on the subject. Plan to purchase several books on the subject. Join writer's groups. Attend their meetings. Ask questions. Get involved. Do the same stuff you did when you got into your first career. Education, apprenticeship, practice/study/practice some more/study some more.

If you're going to self publish, I think you should use as your role model those writers who are successful. Please don't fall for a slick website. The reality is that those companies are good at only one thing: Taking money from writers who have stars in their eyes and an unquenchable desire to see their books in print on a bookshelf right now. Consider the benefits of delayed gratification. You will benefit a thousand times for the moments when you paused to learn more before you jumped into deep water.

You did a great job on all the research to write your book. Put in a relatively small amount of research to learn the most effective way of bringing your books to market. Either get yourself a New York deal with a decent advance or be a REAL self publisher. The first is a very unlikely possibility, and the second is a reasonable, workable approach that has rewarded thousands of writers.

You may be wondering what makes me think I know so much about this stuff. Just that my observations come from 16 years of publishing, the fact that I make a good living from this business, and the clear knowledge that I could not have succeeded had I done any of the things I'm warning about.

P.S.

I know writers who made the mistake of paying money to such companies, eventually realized the folly, reconfigured their approach to take back control, and began to do very well. So if you've gotten your books hitched to other people and given others control over your writing life, it's not too late. Read the fine print on your contract to see what is involved in taking back every right you gave them. Maybe you can republish under new ISBNs that you own. Maybe you can do new, professional covers, and get proper editing. With effort, you can probably take complete control over your new writing career, just as you did with your first career.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Self Publishing - What Not To Do Part 2

Last week I said that there is a very simple way to cut through the hype and hyperbole on a publisher or "self-publisher." This is the most basic, obvious way to judge if a publisher or so-called "self publisher" company is worthy. It's so basic that we often overlook it. Apply this test to any and every publishing services provider.

Ask them for the names of their authors who make a good living from their books.

That's a simple question with a simple answer. "John Doe and Suzie Doe each made $50,000 last year publishing with us. And Mary Roe made $100,000 with us in each of the last six years."

I've posed this question before. No one has come up with any names of successful writers using these "self-publishing" services. NO ONE. Do they exist? For the good of writers, I hope so. But I have yet to hear of one.

Does that mean that self-published authors don't ever make money? Of course not. Thousands of authors who put their books out with real self-publishing - their own businesses with their own ISBN numbers and their own marketing and control of all aspects of their own books - do very well. Some make over a million dollars a year. Many, many make over $100,000 a year. Countless self-published authors make $50,000 a year.

Do any of these authors sign up with one of the internet companies that has a slick website promising self-publishing success, promising that they'll handle all of the details, promising that they'll give you all of these amazing benefits for only $50 or $199 or $499? Plus, because your writing is so stellar, they'll allow you to participate in their advanced marketing/editing/promotion package for only $999?!

Gag, choke, cough, give me a break.

Again, no one has yet given me the name of an author who makes a decent living working with one of these publishers. Maybe there are some one-book wonders, writers who bought the "self-publishing" service and then uncorked a bestseller and made a bunch of money in one year. But I've never heard of them. And as for writers who, year after year, do well? I'd be astounded. The reason is that if anyone can successfully sell books (which of course a writer has to do himself or herself, because the companies provide no help), they would quickly switch over to real self publishing so they can make decent money instead of giving a percentage to a company that did nothing other than add the book to their internet catalog.

So, if you are a successful writer earning $50,000 or $100,000 or more income by publishing through one of these companies, please reveal yourself. Let other would-be writers see the rewards of working with the "self-publishing" company you use. Let other writers explore your sales rankings and appreciate the professionalism of the book covers the "self-publishing" company put on your books. Let other writers see your reviews and media coverage and distribution and learn from your success. You would be doing the world a big favor if you could show us that in fact there are self-publishing service companies that really do provide a worthwhile service.

I've asked this before, but no one has responded. The simple truth is that successful self-published authors do it all themselves so that they have complete control. It is that control that allows them to succeed. Without control, if you have the world's greatest idea about your published books, you have to try to contact someone who has control at your publisher. Someone who can make decisions. Someone who is willing to implement your idea. Of course, that person may be on vacation. Or playing golf while you are waiting for a return phone call or email. And when you get a response, it may be negative. Sorry, we don't do that...

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Self-Publishing - What Not To Do

In last week's post, I mentioned several reasons why self publishing is a logical default approach for new writers. What I forgot to do was explain what self publishing is and isn't. So this post is a clarification.

A clarification that could properly be called a rant. The rant comes from the frustration I've witnessed in dozens of writers I've met over the last few years who've signed their publication rights over to a so-called "self publishing" publisher. This post and perhaps another or two won't be very much about the best way to self publish. It will be very much about the worst way to self publish. Thus a rant. A warning.

(First, a qualification. If your only goal is to get your book printed and up on Amazon so you can know that your kids and grandchildren and neighbors can read your story, then ignore this post. If you don't care about selling significant numbers of books or finding a substantial audience of readers, ignore this post. If you have no aspirations for a career as a writer, ignore this post. And please know that there is nothing wrong with the simple desire to take the easiest approach to getting your book printed and up on Amazon. That "easiest approach," whatever you determine it to be, needs no comment or critique from me!)

(Second, a disclaimer. What follows is merely one writer's view of the world of publishing. It is not the one true vision. I'm not the one true expert. Take everything I say with a healthy skepticism.)

(Third, a caveat. If you are already a published author and you are happy with your current publishing arrangement, whatever it is, then don't read any of this post. It will just distract you from what you should be doing, which is working on your next book!)

Having said that...

To state what might be obvious but often isn't in a world filled with companies trying to sell "self-publishing services," self publishing is publishing yourself.

Over and over, writers fall for "self-publishing" scams. They pay money to a company that claims to self-publish them. This entire premise is false. If you self publish, that means you publish yourself. If you pay money to an outfit that claims to help you, you are more than likely buying snake oil.

Self publishing means that you figure out how to get your books to the marketplace and you have control over that. You figure out the mechanisms to get your books into paper form and ebook form and you have control over that. You arrange for your cover design, your editing, your formatting. You get your own ISBN number. You decide your discounts, your retail price, which distributors and retailers you will sell to, whether they be the likes of the behemoth Amazon or the corner bookstore or the neighborhood cafe.

If, instead, you pay money to one of the ten thousand companies that call themselves self-publishing companies, you are not really a self publisher. You give up control to another company. They own the ISBN. They control the distribution. They make the critical decisions. Pricing, marketing, distribution, promotions. In the rare event that you find a company that claims to still allow you to make these decisions, move very carefully. Why are you paying them money? What is the point? To make it so you don't have to learn to do the very things that dramatically enhance your ability to find an audience and sell books?

At this point, I should point out that if they don't ask you to pay them any money and instead only ask for you to sign over your publication rights, then that's the fee you are "paying" them.

In other words, one could logically sort out publishing scenarios and consider the two most attractive versions. The first is when a publisher pays you a substantial cash advance in return for those publication rights to your book. The second is when you bring your book to market yourself, keep all the rights, all the control, and make certain that all reasonable monies flow to your bank account and not the account of some other company that owns the ISBN number. (Technically, the owner of the ISBN number is the publisher of your book and will be listed as such in all appropriate databases, i.e., if you own the ISBN number, you are the publisher.)

When you give up control to another company, you'd be amazed at what you can't do. In most cases, you can't control much of the most critical aspects of your writing career. There will be a layer of bureaucracy between you and your book. If you want to fix mistakes in your paper book or ebook, good luck. If you want to get a bunch of books at a really good price to take to talks and book clubs and festivals, you're out of luck. If you want to have enough margin to entice bookstores with a full 50% discount and free freight, you will make zero money or even end up paying out of pocket for the privilege of selling to them. If you want distributors like Baker & Taylor or Ingram to take on your book, you won't be able to give them the 55% discount they require.

The list goes on. If you want to change course with your marketing, you have to convince someone else to let you do it. If you want a reviewer to consider reviewing your book, you have to convince them not to be affected by a possible stigma connected to the reputation of your so-called "self-publishing services" company. If you want the larger world of books - stores and media and conventions and conferences to take you seriously, good luck. Professionals in the book world often take one look at your "self-publishing" company and see that you got sold by one of those "internet publishers" who made your book available on Amazon and other internet sales channels, and they know you paid good money to an outfit to have them do what you could have done yourself for free. You become stigmatized by your choices that suggest you didn't do your due diligence.

In addition is the possibility that your actual publisher - not you, but the company who owns your ISBN number - maybe takes a chunk of the money off the top, money that should come to you. You paid them to set up what you could have done for free, and then on top of that you may have given them permanent rights to take a percentage of every book that you sell for what could be the rest of your life and the life of your children.

That same "self publisher" may sell their business and then a stranger you've never heard of owns rights to your books. Or the ISBN owner dies and that person's wastrel nephew inherits the rights to your books. At the very least, you have a major problem on your hands. At the worst... Well, as a writer, you can probably imagine the worst. And all of it is unnecessary.

Next week: A simple measure that will immediately tell you if a publisher of any sort is any good at all...